Tag Archives: self-preservation

learning to take it seriously

I’ve had asthma ever since I was a baby, I think. I won’t lie and say that it didn’t factor into my decision to get into respiratory, either — I wanted to have control.

I’d always hated games with running. I remember hating tag in elementary school — I could never outrun anybody. Eventually my chest would get tight and hurt, and I’d cough and feel like I couldn’t breathe. I’d have to stop and then I’d get tagged, and I couldn’t tag anybody else. So I just didn’t play.

Mom put me in soccer. I hated it instantly, with its constant running after the ball. Other sports seemed like more of the same. This continued until I was about 13, when I walked into the doctor’s office (by myself) and demanded some kind of testing. I got a Ventolin inhaler and a referral for some testing. The testing showed airway obstruction with reversibility — a hallmark of asthma.

I had a problem, though. My parents had never taken me seriously about this (“You’re just out of shape” is something I heard a lot) and I had some real misconceptions about severity and proper treatment. I ended up at one point taking a steroid inhaler but I ended up with a lot of hoarseness of the voice (I later learned this is a common side effect) and eventually stopped taking it. I had no idea how severe I was.

It wasn’t until I was older, several years older, and looking to get into respiratory, that I had a second spirometry and learned to interpret what it means. I was a bit taken aback by the degree of impairment it showed — I had always thought I was relatively mild, that my asthma was “well controlled” with just my Ventolin inhaler to take when I needed it. (The truth was, my asthma had always been poorly controlled, and would remain poorly controlled for years afterwards.) It was the first opportunity I’d had to print out a copy of the testing and show it to my parents — “See, I’m not making this shit up” — and interpret it for them. I showed my family physician a copy — he was a bit tickled and compared it to the one I’d had done before — and he immediately adjusted my medication to better control things, seeing that my lung function had declined significantly since the one I’d had previously. It would be a few more years before I would learn that this was a bad sign, a negative effect of poor control, that poor control would sabotage my lung function slowly until I ended up like somebody who’d smoked for years.

Even after I’d gotten into respiratory, denial is somewhat of a strong impulse. I see these people who are wheezing and struggling, I do PFTs on the asthmatics who have even poorer control than I do (and perhaps, still smoke,) and I get the groove carved into my brain that this is what ‘severe’ looks like. My daily symptoms, my inability to participate in any kind of real ‘cardio’ without symptoms, my exacerbations which would have me wheezing for weeks on end, those didn’t register as ‘severe’. I had had poor breathing for so long that attacks didn’t frighten me. I could breathe through them and limit my activity. I could suck on cough drops and take my Ventolin only when the coughing was paroxysmal, with me gagging, doubling over, seeing stars.

Beginning work as an RT probably was the best thing for my asthma. I had peer pressure from coworkers when my tight cough manifested itself at work. I figured out something that worked for my symptoms — and ended up taking a fairly large dose of it to remain in some semblance of ‘control’ — but wasn’t exactly compliant with it. (I’m not alone, rates of nonadherence to medication are really high and is the main reason for severe exacerbations in asthmatics.) It wasn’t until I sought investigation for allergy testing that I got appropriately slapped for this.

Little did I know, the allergy specialist I was booked to see is also an asthma specialist. I didn’t expect my (terrible) spirometry to be put on display in his office, but there it was. I also didn’t expect to have to detail, in mortifying detail, my lack of adherence to my prescribed medication regimen.

I endured, hanging my head, my scathing lecture about how I should know better, about how my spirometry was all chronic changes, about how he should not have to belabour this point, about taking it seriously. I don’t know if it was internalized ignorance, I don’t know if it was mostly denial, but I do know I took this guy seriously.

I went home with a renewed conviction to take this seriously. I was adherent to the medication regimen properly for the first time since ever, and around about six weeks of this I had an epiphany. I could breathe. I could breathe and I was simultaneously amazed at how used to not being able to breathe a person could get. I had always thought that constant symptoms were normal, and I had a high tolerance for feeling awful all the time.

During this time, I took up running. I had always resigned myself to never being able to run. I amazed myself and conquered running, and found that after a small uphill battle training period I began to enjoy it. I began to become very sensitive to changes in how I felt and I learned to respond quickly to symptoms instead of suffering through them. When I had a significant exacerbation, I went to the doctor and went on Prednisone, instead of digging my heels in, instead of deciding that a month of feeling terrible was worth not having to take five days of oral steroids. I was shocked at how fast I felt better from the bronchitis that had me exceeding the recommended dose of bronchodilators.  I found the side effects were not as terrible as I had been led to believe.

I know now that I was playing with fire. I don’t entirely know why I did it, if it was denial or if it had more to do with not wanting to be seen as malingering. I do know that if I hadn’t done something about it, it very well could have killed me or left me critically ill. Now, I make it my mission to knock some sense into those like me, those lulled into the fog of thinking they’re not as severe as they really are, those that think they’re in control when they’re really not. Somebody saved my life once, by making me take this seriously. I feel the need to pay it forward.

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the one who doesn’t cry

An unanticipated death; some professional embarrassment in there for good measure. Difficult, due to the fact that the one who died was a child, and a sweet one; that, and the fact that it was likely our fault in some way. (The reader is left to imagine the multitude of ways in which one person in a team of probably hundreds could be possibly at fault. Trust me. We’re all wondering the same thing.)

A debriefing; listening to the vignettes of the family and the child from the circle of chairs in the playroom. Some tall people on some tiny chairs, wilted from night shifts, or the ones fresh from days off, with perfectly applied makeup. They had a long time with this baby, they laid down in his bed and hugged him, patted his tummy to comfort him in that way they had seen his dad do, taking him to the playroom instead of starting his feeds … interviews with mom … years of past history … perhaps wondering why they hadn’t intervened earlier.

If there’s anything I’ve learned through a multitude of shitty situations, a multitude of debriefings, it’s this: no matter what is your fault, it’s over. Learn from it, for it’s the only possible positive outcome of an entirely crappy situation. Beating yourself up about how it could have been better if you had the power to go back in time and fix your fuckups is ultimately a failed exercise in self-loathing, and the self-loathing is an obstacle to learning: what’s happened has happened, so learn for next time, and prevent it from happening again.

A lot of that happened in that debriefing. From the strong and silent among us semi-blaming themselves, knowing what they’d do different, to the ones who have what seem like the easiest jobs in that they are only so tangentially involved, nearly everyone seemed upset nearly to the point of tears.

Except me.

It came to be my turn near the end, and I spoke of equipment malfunctions, problems with sensors, recalibrating X and Y, and of being pissed at myself (not blaming) because I had been so absorbed in the equipment that for that critical minute, I forgot to look at the patient. I wasn’t upset at the death of the kid, I was more pissed at myself that I had immediately jumped to the conclusion that the equipment was messing up on me.

To be fair to myself, the rest of the equipment hadn’t exactly been working as intended, and I’d had problems from the get-go. Things were quiet and stuff that should have been watched wasn’t, but it’s hard to not feel a bit like an uncaring goon when the people who weren’t even there for the arrest seem significantly more shaken up than I am.

It’s remarkable to me because, I think, this is not simply because of respiratory or because of the sheer amount of times I’ve been there when somebody’s died. I don’t think it’s that I’ve become desensitized or somehow heartless regarding the whole incident. Indeed, I was upset about it — I just did all my crying immediately afterwards and not in the debriefing. So it goes.

I think, however, that last paragraph is a bit reflective of how RTs are. We have the face we show to the rest of the team, and then there’s the things we say, the stuff we complain about, the opinions we share, the discussions of what bother us, the planning what to do next, that we all do behind the closed door of the respiratory department. The reason I never cry at organized debriefings, the ones headed by a social worker or someone with training for crying people, is because in order to keep doing what I do, I have to do it every day, by myself, behind a closed door. More often than not, I do it with other RTs. Sometimes, like the particular instance that struck me this time, I end up doing it at 2am with other health professionals, like the nurse who gave me a hug before I cleaned my vent and went home to bed.

I think it’s healthier that way; that I know how to debrief so that I can sleep, that I do it automatically and without needing hand-holding or prompting. I think it’s what means I can do my job without having a nervous breakdown.

Long ago I used to worry that not crying about these things meant I was getting callous and gritty, jaded and bitter, all those things that they usually say about surgeons and cops. I don’t worry about those things anymore: I think I have a better understanding of grief and attachment as a result of having done it more times than I can count. I can survive without losing compassion. Maybe some would call it tough, but I hate that word for this. It’s not some kind of machismo bullshit need to appear all stiff-upper-lippy. It’s just self-preservation. I can sleep without waking up screaming, I can go to work the next morning, and I can still have fun at work. I still love my job. No matter how shitty it gets, I plan to. For a long, long time.

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